Online Marketing Tips, News, and Tutorials

The Updated Pros and Cons of Wearable Tech

Posted by Max Castleman
In January of 2014, I wrote a piece for this blog entitled The Advantages and Disadvantages of Wearable Tech. In it, I made a few informed guesses about a burgeoning, and very intriguing, market. Google Glass had just been released in a limited capacity and companies like Microsoft and Apple had already begun work on competing products. Since then we’ve gotten items like the Pebble smartwatch, the Apple Watch, the Fitbit and the Microsoft Band, to name just a few.
Read More

A New Bug Will Give You That Final Reason to Leave Internet Explorer

Posted by Ken Franzen
Read More

Are We Prepared for the Future?

Posted by Max Castleman
  A few months ago I wrote a post about wearable tech and the societal impact it might have, both upon the wearer of said tech and the people around them. In it, I mentioned that early adopters of these items might be ridiculed and stigmatized by those who did not fully understand the devices and what applications they might have. Now, a new survey by the Pew Research Center has shown my prediction to be accurate. More than half of the people they surveyed said that they believed that wearable tech would have a negative impact upon society, and women seemed especially wary of these items, with the huge majority of those surveyed responding negatively to the idea of items like Google Glass. However, these questions were only a small part of a much larger study. Pew, in conjunction with Smithsonian magazine, recently interviewed 1,001 Americans across the country, asking them for their opinion about various future technologies, most of which are expected to be here rather soon. The results of their study are fascinating, and the implications of their results are certainly interesting to ponder.
Read More

The Aftermath of the Heartbleed Bug

Posted by Max Castleman
Most of us realize that transmitting information over the internet has its share of risks. That’s why so many of us only share sensitive information, like credit card and social security numbers, with so-called “secure sites,” otherwise known as 'https’ at the beginning of a web address. However, as we learned on April 7th, 2014, even secure sites can fail us from time to time. In fact, as we soon were made aware, millions of secure sites had in fact been failing us, for more than two years. A full two-thirds of websites rely on a program called OpenSSL to encrypt user information, making it possible for visitors to complete credit card transactions and other similarly private tasks without fear that their information could be stolen. What most of us didn’t realize until April 7th was that there was a small error, since nicknamed the Heartbleed bug, in the coding of OpenSSL. It had been there since the very beginning, December of 2011. By abusing this error, hackers could gather some of the information OpenSSL had been put in place to encrypt. In other words, all of that information you shared in confidence, safe in the knowledge that the site you were using was secure, was seemingly up for grabs.
Read More

The Advantages and Disadvantages of Wearable Tech

Posted by Max Castleman
For a long time, wearable tech has been little more than an intriguing concept. We already augment our bodies with various peripherals, using watches to tell time and glasses to protect our eyes or correct our vision. But what if those devices, and others like them, could do even more for us. What if our watches and glasses and jewelry could do what our smartphones do, and perhaps even more? Perhaps the most notable piece of wearable tech available today (albeit on a limited basis) is Google Glass, a pair of glasses augmented with a virtual display which adapts to your environment. It can record whatever you require, translate signs in other languages, give you facts about your surroundings and answer questions on the fly, among many other features. Basically, it’s like constantly having Google in front of you, allowing you to interact with it in real time without the barrier of a computer screen. What some might not realize is that Google Glass is just the tip of the iceberg. There are many pieces of wearable tech currently being developed, everything from interactive fitness equipment to bracelets that tell you when you’ve received a Facebook message. The only question is how soon these items will catch on and how successful they will truly be.
Read More

Avoid Security Breaches: Build a Better Password

Posted by Max Castleman
 
Read More

Bitcoin: The Inherent Folly of the Internet's Cryptocurrency

Posted by Max Castleman
In 2009, an experiment was conducted. Its intent was to determine the viability of a concept known as “cryptocurrency,” funds which could be traded for goods and services like traditional money but with complete confidentiality. In our current economic system that level of security is virtually impossible. Money is regulated by governments and as such anything you do with it will remain under some level of scrutiny. In order to trade money for goods and services identities must be revealed and sensitive information must be shared. In theory, cryptocurrency would eliminate those elements. Each transaction would be blind, an unknown party doing business with another unknown party for their mutual benefit. This idea had been entirely theoretical until the “experiment” of 2009. It was conducted by a “crypto-specialist” who went by the name of Satoshi Nakamoto. He invented the world’s first actual cryptocurrency, the Bitcoin, essentially just to see if he could. As you might imagine, the currency had no value at all. Nakamoto’s invention was entirely hypothetical, essentially imaginary. That would soon change.
Read More

Are Paid Operating Systems a Thing of the Past?

Posted by Max Castleman
 
Read More